Peter Bye

I recently received a brochure from Vote Leave[i]. It says that it presents ‘5 positive reasons to Vote Leave and take back control’. How do these claims stand up? Number one is called ‘Our money, our priorities’. The brochure claims that ‘we send over £350 million to the EU every week’, or an annual figure… » read more

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Posted by pbye

In my previous piece (2nd February) I said that immigration was close to the top of Britons’ concerns, according to an Economist/Ipsos MORI poll[1]. Security, identified in the poll as ‘Defence/foreign affairs/terrorism’, was regarded as the most important issue, although it was only just ahead of immigration. However, as I suggested, the various concerns are… » read more

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Posted by pbye

Leadership in a democracy

In my last piece, I said that Jeremy Corbyn was the unexpected favourite in the race to become Ed Milliband’s successor as leader of the Labour Party in the UK. He more than maintained his position: he won on the first ballot, with 59% of the vote. Shortly after, on the 29th September, he gave… » read more

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Posted by pbye

Ed Miliband resigned the leadership of the British Labour Party immediately following the party’s unexpectedly heavy defeat in the May 2015 general election. The resignation triggered a contest for leadership of the party. Nominations for leadership candidates are made by members of the parliamentary party – the MPs. Each successful candidate requires the support of… » read more

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Distorted information regarding immigration and other subjects creates Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt about the EU. To counter some of the FUD, we thought it might be useful to state the views on EU membership of two UK citizens. For any statements of fact, we provide sources and, where we are simply expressing our own opinion,… » read more

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Posted by pbye

It seems obvious that government policies should be guided by facts and numbers – evidence-based policy, in other words. Yet all too often it appears to be the other way round. Evidence is ignored or distorted unless it suits the policy. Statements may be asserted as facts when there is no real evidence to support… » read more

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Posted by pbye